Well-Being Library

A collection of documents, compiled by the ALICE RAP scientists, on well-being research and policy initiatives. If you would like to add a document to this library, please write with the reference or document itself to fmbooth@clinic.ub.es.

Documents

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Compendium of OECD well-being indicators Compendium of OECD well-being indicators

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Date added: 05/10/2012
Date modified: 05/14/2012
Filesize: 1.39 MB
Downloads: 1788

Author: OECD

In recent years, concerns have emerged regarding the fact that macro-economic statistics did not portray the right image of what ordinary people perceived about the state of their own lives. Addressing these concerns is crucial, not just for the credibility and accountability of public policies, but for the very functioning of our democracies. The OECD has been leading the international reflection on this challenge through various projects and initiatives.
The publication of a set of well-being indicators for developed and selected emerging economies is an important new contribution to this debate.

In recent years, concerns have emerged regarding the fact that macro-economic statistics did not portray the right image of what ordinary people perceived about the state of their own lives. Addressing these concerns is crucial, not just for the credibility and accountability of public policies, but for the very functioning of our democracies.

The OECD has been leading the international reflection on this challenge through various projects1 and initiatives. In 2004, it held its first World Forum on „Statistics, Knowledge and Policies‟ in Palermo. Two more Forums took place in Istanbul in 2007, which led to the launch of the OECD-hosted Global Project on Measuring the Progress of Societies, and in Busan in 2009. Thanks to these and other efforts undertaken in the international community, measuring well-being and progress is now at the forefront of national and international statistical and political agendas (Box 1). This agenda is not relevant for developed countries only as improving people‟s well-being is a goal for every government in the world.

1 OECD, 2001; Boarini et al., 2006.

The OECD is preparing an important new contribution to this debate, with the publication of a set of well-being indicators for developed and selected emerging economies.

ALICE RAP Discussion document on well-being ALICE RAP Discussion document on well-being

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Date added: 05/24/2012
Date modified: 06/14/2012
Filesize: 576.51 kB
Downloads: 3932

Drafted by Peter Anderson (ALICE RAP)

For ALICE RAP, the OECD frame is taken as a model to re-frame the understanding of addictions in contemporary European society and as a base to re-design addictions governance for better individual and societal well-being.

A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society

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Date added: 05/02/2012
Date modified: 06/14/2012
Filesize: 2.79 MB
Downloads: 1541

Authors: Hetan Shah and Nic Marks (nef)

This well-being manifesto seeks to answer the question “what would politics look like if promoting people’s well-being was one of government’s main aims?” - by the nef (new economics foundation), UK.

A framework to measure the progress of societies A framework to measure the progress of societies

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Date added: 04/30/2012
Date modified: 06/14/2012
Filesize: 466.22 kB
Downloads: 2129

Authors: Jon Hall, Enrico Giovannini, Adolfo Morrone and Giulia Ranuzzi (OEDC)
Over the last three decades, a number of frameworks have been developed to promote and measure well-being, quality of life, human development and sustainable development. Some frameworks use a conceptual approach while others employ a consultative approach, and different initiatives to measure progress will require different frameworks. The aim of this paper by the OECD is to present a proposed framework for measuring the progress of societies, and to compare it with other progress frameworks that are currently in use around the world. The framework does not aim to be definitive, but rather to suggest a common starting point that the authors believe is broad-based and flexible enough to be applied in many situations around the world. It is also the intention that the framework could be used to identify gaps in existing statistical standards and to guide work to fill these gaps.